Forbes Middle East spoke to Dr. Tejinder Singh, who shared his successful experience in launching Q-tickets, a booking platform that helps users make various sorts of reservations.

Dr. Tejinder Singh
Dr. Tejinder Singh

FME: When was your company founded and what were the challenges that you faced when launching?

TS: Q-tickets ( A 360 Nautica PTE Venture ) was founded in late 2013 and is currently one of the largest global e-ticketing plat-forms based out of Singapore and has presence across countries like the U.A.E., Oman, Bahrain, Qatar. We continue to scale in geographies like India, Sri Lanka, South Africa and few others.

We established the business with the intention of creating an experiential platform for online ticketing across verticals such as e movies, events, sports and leisure. The initial challenges that we faced were all part of the usual launch process.

We had validated the product well in advance and built our own technology, which is not very usual in ticketing space.

This gives a huge edge to Q-tickets since we are able to customize as per the client’s needs.

Since its inception, Q-tickets has gained significant market share in the Qatar, U.A.E. and other locations, subscribed more than one million users, and sold more than eight million tickets and managed prestigious events like PSL, Qatar Motor Show, The Great British Festival amongst others.

FME: What is the regulatory environment for SMEs in GCC?

TS: The GCC is relatively well positioned in the top destinations for ease of doing business.

Today, the business ecosystem is evolving very fast and both the government and the private sector are working to achieve the necessary milestones, and will soon become one of the most favorable business ecosystem for SMEs.

In recent years, the GCC on whole has implemented significant changes in its business regulatory frame-work.

Reforms aiming to improve the local credit information system and stronger regulations in supporting borrowers and lenders are all factors which have played a significant role in ameliorating the business environment for SMEs.

FME: What are your expansion plans over the next two or three years?

TS: Most of our efforts over the next year or two will be focused on improving user interface and enhancing the customer journey through all touch points for our patrons. This means creating a cohesive experience for customers in both the offline and online environment.

We are planning to defragment the operations and processes then enhance, optimize and implement. There are numerous innovative internal programs planned for this mission to be made successful.

We aim to lead and make sure that our team’s innovations convert to action plans and are implemented effectively throughout the eco-system.

The expansion plans geographically would include strengthen presence in Bahrain, Oman and the U.A.E. while adding newer territories like India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, South Africa & West Indies.

FME: What sort of changes could be introduced to make the local environment more conductive to entrepreneurs?

TS: The most integral factors that make the local environment more conducive to entrepreneurs are inclusiveness and exclusiveness.

Entrepreneurs fare best in policy and regulatory environments that keep barriers low, reward innovation, and protect private property.

I strongly believe that entrepreneurs themselves must take a leading role in the building of an eco-system by creating entrepreneurial communities and providing input into policy.

Policymakers should engage in open dialogue with entrepreneurs to find solutions that are appropriate to local circumstances.

All the aspects in an entrepreneurship ecosystem should cooperate and network with other stake-holders to make the most of their respective strengths.